Sophie Wessex ‘brightens the event’ in yellow £750 dress she has in multiple colours – get the look for £50

Despite the grey, drizzly day in London, Sophie Wessex brought some sunshine to the Trooping the Colour with her outfit choice, sporting a bright yellow dress from one of her go-to designers.

The Duchess of Edinburgh, formerly the Countess of Wessex, wore the Yahvi Lemon Dress by British designer Beulah, and it’s still available to buy online for £750. She paired the long-sleeved, tailored dress with a full skirt and covered buttons with the Persephone hat in yellow by family-favourite milliner Jane Taylor, which costs £1,625.

Sophie’s outfit perfectly complimented daughter Lady Louise Windor’s pretty floral dress, with celebrity stylist and royal fashion expert Lynne McKenna telling OK! that “the duo’s coordinated and thoughtful fashion choices not only brightened the event but also showcased their commitment to sustainability and timeless elegance”.



Sophie Duchess of Edinburgh at Trooping The Colour

Sophie, Duchess of Edinburgh wore this colourful yellow dress
(Image: Victoria Jones/REX/Shutterstock)

The Duchess is clearly a big fan of the style of this dress as she’s worn it in other colours in the past. Last year she wore the cream colour on a trip to meet with the President and First Lady of Iraq, while earlier this year she recreated the famous Beatles Abbey Road shot wearing the bright coral version.

Described on the Beulah website as “a beautiful choice for summer events”, this 100% wool dress features midi-length flared sleeves, a fitted bodice and a full skirt.

Looking for something similar for less? We love the Salma Fluted Sleeve Dress from Lavish Alice, priced at a much more wallet-friendly £138.



Salma Fluted Sleeve Dress from Lavish Alice

Get Sophie’s look for less with this dress
(Image: Lavish Alice)

ASOS is always a good place to look for designer dupes too, including this £50 high neck, long sleeve dress – ideal if you’re looking for something a little looser fitting.

The Duchess and her husband and daughter joined the rest of the Royal Family on Buckingham Palace’s balcony for the traditional military planes flypast, standing next to Queen Camilla to watch the spectacle.

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