More than 3,000 shark fins confiscated in Colombia

Thousands of shark fins on their way for sale in Hong Kong were seized in Colombia
Thousands of shark fins on their way for sale in Hong Kong were seized in Colombia.

Thousands of shark fins were confiscated by Colombian authorities before they could be illegally shipped to Hong Kong, officials said.

Bogota “seized 3,493 shark fins and 117 kilos of fish bladders that were en route to Hong Kong”, environmental ministry head Carolina Urrutia said.

The haul highlights the continued demand for , served at wedding banquets in some Chinese communities and falsely believed to have medicinal properties.

The fins, removed from 900 to 1,000 sharks measuring up to five metres, were found on Friday in five boxes in Bogota’s busiest airport El Dorado.

Taken “more than three species” of shark, the fins were likely harvested in ““, said Urrutia, condemning “the irreversible environmental damage to Colombia’s marine ecosystem”.

National police will handle the investigation, she added.

Shark fishing has been banned in Colombia—which is home to 76 of the 500 known shark varieties—since 2020 in an attempt to stem Asia’s fin trade.

The sale and consumption of shark fin is not illegal in Hong Kong but must be licensed, and has remained stubbornly popular despite years of campaigning.

Some of the ‘s most vital apex predators, shark populations have been decimated over the last few decades with finning and industrial longline fishing the main culprits.



© 2021 AFP

Citation: More than 3,000 shark fins confiscated in Colombia (2021, September 25) retrieved 7 October 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2021-09-shark-fins-confiscated-colombia.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Note: This article have been indexed to our site. We do not claim legitimacy, ownership or copyright of any of the content above. To see the article at original source Click Here

Related Posts
4 ways to improve your phone’s battery life thumbnail

4 ways to improve your phone’s battery life

Whether you spend all your time at home, or two hours commuting to work, keeping your phone’s battery alive for a full day can be a challenge. This is especially true if you use your phone to respond to emails, take calls, or as a mobile gaming station. Finding ways to pull just a little…
Read More
Widespread megaripple activity found on Martian north pole area thumbnail

Widespread megaripple activity found on Martian north pole area

“Megaripples” are distinct wind-driven bedforms that occur on the surface of Earth and Mars. Here, megaripples are shown at the bottom of center adjacent to the north polar sand dunes in this perspective view using data returned from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). These northern polar megaripples and dunes yield the highest known…
Read More
What's New on Disney+ in July 2023 thumbnail

What’s New on Disney+ in July 2023

Screenshot: Bluey Season 3 trailer/Disney+ (Fair Use)A few weeks ago, one of Lifehacker’s regular freelancer contributors pitched us an idea for a parenting story: Streaming shows to watch when you’re sick of the kids watching Bluey over and over. Reader, I rejected this pitch, because Bluey is possibly the best show for kids and parents
Read More
What we know so far about how covid-19 affects sperm thumbnail

What we know so far about how covid-19 affects sperm

Evidence suggests covid-19 infections can lower sperm counts for months, and that the virus can occasionally be found in semen and may even directly bind to sperm cells Health 15 July 2022 By Carissa Wong False-colour scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of human spermCNRI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Covid-19 infections can lower sperm count and the virus may…
Read More
Benefits of virtual rehab for stroke recovery thumbnail

Benefits of virtual rehab for stroke recovery

University of British Columbia Okanagan researchers are investigating new ways to help stroke survivors recover movement in their lower body, from hips to feet. Stroke often affects this area, leading to a lower quality of life, mental health issues, and an increased risk of falls. Master’s candidate Sarah Park of UBC Okanagan’s Centre for Chronic
Read More
Index Of News
Total
0
Share