Your Kid’s Aversion to Broccoli May Be Genetic

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Sept. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Parents and their children often share numerous traits — including a dislike for broccoli and other veggies in the same family.

Noxious enzymes from bacteria in saliva may be the reason why, a new study suggests.

Levels of these compounds are similar in parents and children, which might be why these vegetables are turnoffs for both generations, especially when the levels are high, researchers said.

Besides broccoli, this Brassica group includes cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts.

Brassica veggies offload a compound — called S-methyl-ʟ-cysteine sulfoxide — that produces potent, sulfurous odors that can result in bacteria in some folks’ mouths, researchers noted.

For the study, published Sept. 22 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Damian Frank and his colleagues from CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, investigated differences in sulfur production in saliva from children and adults. They then analyzed how this production affected Brassica acceptance.

The researchers had 98 child-parent pairs, including children ages 6 to 8, rate the key odor compounds. Dimethyl trisulfide, which smells rotten and sulfurous, was the least liked by the children and adults.

The team mixed saliva samples with raw cauliflower powder and analyzed the volatile compounds made over time. Large differences in sulfur volatile production were found between people, but children often had similar levels as their parents.

Children whose saliva produced high amounts of sulfur volatiles hated raw Brassica vegetables the most, but this was not seen in adults, who might have learned to tolerate the flavor. These findings may explain why some people like Brassica vegetables and others don’t, the researchers said in a journal news release.

More information

The American Psychological Association has more on food preferences.

SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release, Sept. 17, 2021

Note: This article have been indexed to our site. We do not claim legitimacy, ownership or copyright of any of the content above. To see the article at original source Click Here

Related Posts
The Challenge, Promise of Getting Oral COVID Drugs Into Practice thumbnail

The Challenge, Promise of Getting Oral COVID Drugs Into Practice

Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. As the pandemic wears on, with new concerns and uncertainty around the Omicron variant, attention toward therapeutics is intensifying — particularly oral medications that could be offered readily to outpatients to keep their disease from worsening. "An effective oral agent has…
Read More
Faxes and Snail Mail: Will Pandemic-Era Flaws Unleash Improved Health Technology? thumbnail

Faxes and Snail Mail: Will Pandemic-Era Flaws Unleash Improved Health Technology?

Jamie Taylor received two letters from the Missouri Department of Social Services Family Support Division that began, “Good news,” before stating that she was denied Medicaid coverage. Her income exceeded the state’s limits for the federal-state public health insurance program for people with low incomes. Missouri officials now blame the incongruous greeting for the decidedly…
Read More
How to Do the Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift thumbnail

How to Do the Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift

THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE beginners often face is determining the best place to start. This holds especially true for exercisers just setting off on their journey with deadlifts, one of the most important compound movements in the strength training universe. There are lots of deadlift variations you'll see in the gym—from conventional and sumo barbell approaches
Read More
Dozens of swimmers fall ill after UK triathlon competition thumbnail

Dozens of swimmers fall ill after UK triathlon competition

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain At least 57 people suffered from diarrhea and vomiting after swimming in the sea during the UK leg of the World Triathlon Championship Series, health officials have said. Around 2,000 people took part in the events in Sunderland, northeast England, last weekend, which included swimming off the city's Roker beach. The
Read More
Index Of News
Consider making some contribution to keep us going. We are donation based team who works to bring the best content to the readers. Every donation matters.
Donate Now

Subscription Form

Liking our Index Of News so far? Would you like to subscribe to receive news updates daily?

Total
0
Share